Have you ever thought what the world would be like in 8-bit? Things that are usually tiny would be monstrous. Imagine a giant, blocky mosquito buzzing around your head while you’re trying to sleep. Or a piece of spinach in your teeth.

On the other hand, some things would look no different. For instance, Jay Leno’s chin, or a Mondrian painting1.

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8-bit is a throwback to a time when computers and video games had a distinct style; a time when a pixel was so big you could literally see the square that made it. Think back to your first Nintendo (aka “ancient gaming console” for you younger individuals). You’d come home from school, throw your backpack down, and immediately start playing video games, your eyes glued to the screen for hours. Back then, the ingredients for happiness were simple. One blocky mushroom, a few gold coins, and a strangely constructed moustache. That’s all that stood between us and total contentment.

8-bit is a throwback to a time when computers and video games had a distinct style; a time when a pixel was so big you could literally see the square that made it.

Even the non-gamers out there will admit that there’s something compelling about 8-bit art. It gives us the ability to communicate in such a simple way, allowing us to whittle complexity down to its basic form. 8-bit looks at things from a whole new perspective.

8-bit fun

Check out what we were able to come up with with just a few coloured blocks and an afternoon. This one is especially for all you die-hard, open source contributors. And this design is for nature-lovers, who also love code.

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[1] Disclaimer: We are cultured individuals who understand that Mondrian’s blocks represent more than just… ummm… blocks. In his own words: “I wish to approach truth as closely as is possible, and therefore I abstract everything until I arrive at the fundamental quality of objects.”

Interesting tidbit: There is a statistical data-visualisation system named after Mondrian.